Are your practices safe and secure?

Dealing with unsafe situations or appliances is a regular occurrence for engineers working with out-of-date or damaged installations.

The guidance on how to deal with them is set out as Gas Industry Unsafe Situations Procedure and the big change to regulations came in 2015, but there have been updates since then. Clive McCann, training support inspector with the Gas Safe Register, advises: “Things change; the older procedures have been withdrawn. Time moves on and we have to move with them.”


Courses of action

All gas-safe engineers have to be aware of the key document, IGEM\G\11, which covers exactly what corrective action to take. The starting point is a risk assessment where you must decide if there is ID (immediate danger) or AR (at risk). An example of ID can be a gas escape from an appliance, or a spillage of combustible products or fumes. An example of AR is an under-sized vent for an old boiler, which has a potential to be a future risk. In this situation the advice is to inform the customer and ensure it goes in the log of work. McCann says: “A lot of boilers we all still find are under-sized so this is a common issue.”

AR is particularly important for landlord gas safety records, which have to be updated every 12 months.

There is some good news: an engineer can update the record up to two months before the due date and you can now roll over the 12 months from the date of update.

Under gas safety regulations, an engineer is expected to visually check an installation for signs of trouble or stress.


More information

Go to the engineer section for bulletins and safety alerts at www.gassafetyregister.co.uk


This article first appeared in the Nov/Dec 2018 issue of P&H Engineering, the magazine for members of the CIPHE. Find out how to join here.

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